Expressions with “change”

Big / significant / considerable / revolutionary / drastic / important / major, radical change
Mobile phones have undergone a revolutionary change in the past decade.
Complete / systematic / minor / long-term / short-term / sudden / gradual / seasonal change
Gradual changes will bring more stability to the company.
Climate change
The effects of climate change include more frequent droughts and wildfires.
Bring about change
The only way to bring about changes in the company is to employ new people.
A change for the better / worse
I believe that this year will bring a change for the better.
A change of heart / mind
UK Brexit change of mind appeared first on Cyprus Mail.
Change clothes / shoes
I’m all wet. I’ll change my clothes.
Change trains / planes
We changed trains in Budapest.
Change the subject
I don’t want to talk about it any more. Can we change the subject?
Change jobs
I think you should change jobs.
Change one’s tune
He was against the project, but he changed his tune when he realized how much money it could bring.
Change your mind
At first, I didn’t want to go to the party, but then I changed my mind.
Change your ways
If he wants to stay and work in this company, he’ll have to change his ways.
Change of scene
You need a change of scene. Why don’t you go away for the weekend?

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Vocabulary: Words related to WORK

In this post, we are going to focus on vocabulary related to work in English so that you can get a greater knowledge of this specific vocabulary. Below are some words that you may come across when searching for a job or on the job altogether with example sentences:

WORKFORCE, n. – all the people who work for a company.

Ex: Our company is cutting its workforce.

ADVISER, n. – someone whose job is to give advice about a subject.

Ex: You should talk to a financial adviser before you invest your money.

DISMISSAL, n. – the situation in which an employer officially makes someone leave their job.

Ex: The workers are claiming compensation for their dismissals.

OVERLOAD, n. – to give someone more work than they can deal with.

Ex: Work overload causes stress.

RECRUIT, v. – to find new people to work for the company.

Ex: We are having difficulty recruiting enough staff during high season.

SKELETON STAFF, n. – the smallest number of people needed for a business or organization to operate.

Ex: There was only skeleton staff on duty for the New Year’s Eve.

TRAINEE, n. – a person who is being trained for a particular job.

Ex: I got a job of a trainee chef in that new restaurant.

VACANCY, n. – a job available for someone new to do.

Ex: There are couple of vacancies in that company.

LEAVE, n. – time allowed away from work for a holiday or illness.

Ex: Tom will be on sick leave till Friday.

LABOUR, v. – work hard.

Ex: They laboured all day in the factory.

UNPROFESSIONAL, adj. – not showing the behaviour or skill acceptable in a particular profession.

Ex: I believe Jane was fired for her unprofessional manners.

Time-off Expressions

To take time off – to be absent from work, at home, or on vacation.
Ex: I’m going to take a few days off to visit my parents.
To take a vacation – to take time away from work, especially when you travel
from pleasure.
Ex: I’m taking my vacation next month. We’re going to Greece.
To take a sabbatical – to take time away from work to study or travel, usually
while continuing to be paid.
Ex: He’s on sabbatical while he does his MBA. He’ll be back next month.
To take unpaid leave – to have an authorized absence from work but without
salary.
Ex: She’s taken some unpaid leave while she moves the house.
To be off sick – to be absent from work due to illness.
Ex: When you’re off sick, you must provide a doctor’s note.
Sick leave – the time when you can be absent from work, often while being
paid part or all of your salary.
Ex: She is having an operation and she’ll be on sick leave for the next two months.
Maternity leave – the period a mother is legally authorized to be absent from
work before and after the birth of a child.
Ex: Her maternity leave finishes next week but she is not coming back to work.
Parental leave – the time that a parent is allowed to spend away from work to
take care of their baby.
Ex: He has taken parental leave to look after the baby while his wife returns to
work.
Statutory sick pay – the money paid by a company to an employee who
cannot work due to illness.
Ex: If you are absent from work due to illness, you may be able to claim sick pay.
A public holiday – a day when almost everybody does not have to go to work
(for example in the US July 4th or January 1st).
Ex: We have 25 days paid holiday plus 10 public holidays.

TIME expressions

A while back / a while ago

About time

After a while

Ahead of time

All along / all the while

All day long

At all times

At that point / moment

At times / sometimes

At the same time

At the worst possible time

Every now and then / from time to time

Every so often / once in a while

From now on / from this day forward

From way back

To have a hard time

Have all the time in the world

In no time

It can wait

It’s a matter of time

Once and for all

Run out of time

Day after day /day by day

At last

At one time

For good

High time

In old days

In the meantime

Long ago

No longer

So far

Take time

Time out