Nouns which are only plural

There are three groups of nouns that we use only in the plural. We use them with plural verbs and plural pronouns:

Your glasses are dirty. Take a tissue to wipe them.

These groups of nouns are:

1) Nouns related to items consisting of two parts (glasses, scissors, jeans, trousers…)

My new trousers are so cosy.

You can talk about them in singular if you use ‘a pair of’:

This pair of scissors is very sharp.

2) Nouns ending in –S (clothes, stairs, belongings, thanks, congratulations…)

These clothes are dirty.

The stairs in their house were too narrow.

Remember that these nouns are countable as they answer the question how many, not how much.

How many belongings have you got?

3) Nouns which express groups of people or animals (police, cattle, folk, people, poultry…)

The police are in front of the building.

They use growth hormones to make cattle grow faster.

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Travel Phrasal Verbs

It’s summer time and few of us aren’t going to hit the road in search for the best tourist destination where we could have proper rest and lots of fun. I hope this post will come handy as it looks at the phrasal verbs used to talk about things when travelling.
Go away – go on a trip
I’m going away next week. I’ve been working hard lately and I need some rest.
Set off – leave, start travelling.
We are setting off early in order to avoid heavy traffic.
Look forward to – to be excited and impatient about something that is going to happen.
I’m looking forward to my holiday next week! I’m dead tired.
Get in – arrive
What time do we get in Paris?
See off – to go to a place that someone is leaving from to tell them goodbye.
We saw the children off yesterday. They’ve gone camping.
Go back – return to the place you were before.
We are going back home in two days, but I wish we could stay longer.
Check in – to arrive at a hotel and get the key for your room.

We checked in at two in the morning because the plane was late.

Check out – to leave a hotel after paying for your room and returning the key.
We must check out before 11.
Look around – to visit a place and look at things there.
They spent all day looking around the town.
Drop someone off – to drive someone somewhere and leave them there, especially if it’s on your way.
Can you drop me off at the station on your way to work?
Pick up – collect
Can you pick me up from the airport tomorrow afternoon, please?
Take off – when a plane leaves the ground.
Would you please fasten your seatbelts, the plane is taking off.
Stop over – to stay somewhere for some time on the way to somewhere else.
On our way to Spain, we’ll stop over in Rome to see the sights.

How to Express Your Opinion in English

When we give our opinion, we say what we think about something. We can express our opinion in many different ways, but we should take care of the way we’re expressing it. The thing is that we should try not to be too direct as it may be contradictory to someone else’s opinion.

Here are some useful phrases which might help you express your opinion in different situations:

In my opinion, I think he’s too young to drive.

I think / don’t think it’s a very good idea.

I am absolutely convinced that your cat would be safe with us for the weekend.

Personally, I think the red dress suits you better than the blue one.

I’m sure that you’ll be satisfied with your new nanny.

If you ask me, I think we should rather eat at a restaurant than cook in the hot kitchen.

Frankly, I think it’s a great idea!

As far as I’m concerned, the best way to learn English is going to an English speaking country.

In my experience, there’s no use rushing the costumers to their decision.

Speaking for myself, I am ready to sign the contract.

I hope you don’t mind me saying this, but your old car was better than the new one.