Zero Conditional

Conditional sentences consist of two or more clauses. One of the clauses is the "if clause" and the other is the "main clause". Both if clause and main clause are usually in Present Simple Tense. If I can't sleep -------------- I listen to the radio. -------if clause --------------------- main clause------ The zero conditional is used … Continue reading Zero Conditional

Time – off Expressions

To take time off – to be absent from work, at home, or on vacation.Ex: I’m going to take a few days off to visit my parents. To take a vacation – to take time away from work, especially when you travel from pleasure.Ex: I’m taking my vacation next month. We’re going to Greece. To take a sabbatical – … Continue reading Time – off Expressions

10 Expressions with "Mind"

Bear/keep in mind - remember, don't forget.Ex: Keep in mind that I'm not helping you any longer. From now on, you're on your own! Be in two minds - unable to decide.Ex: I'm in two minds about the job offer. Be open-minded - willing to consider different ideas.Ex: You can talk to me about anything. … Continue reading 10 Expressions with "Mind"

Relative Pronouns

Most commonly used relative pronouns are who, which, that, whose, when and where. We normally use who for people and some pet animals and which for things. We can use that instead of who or which. The woman who (that) gave me the letter. She gave me the letter which (that) was red. This is the computer which (that) costs a lot of money. Is this the person … Continue reading Relative Pronouns

6 Phrasal Verbs with “Ask”

ASK FOR – to request to see or speak to someone. Bob asked for you while you were at work. ASK AFTER SOMEBODY – ask about someone’s health. Milly asked after your dad. ASK AROUND – to ask different people in order to get information. They asked around and eventually someone showed them the way. … Continue reading 6 Phrasal Verbs with “Ask”

How to Use “So” and “Such” Correctly

So and such are used to strengthen the meaning of adjectives. So is used before an adjective without a noun. For example: The film was so boring. My neighbors are so loud. Such is used before an adjective that comes with a noun. For example: It is such a lovely day today. This water pipe … Continue reading How to Use “So” and “Such” Correctly

Collocations about BOOKS

Be absorbed in a book - be totally focused on reading. Ex: Derek didn’t hear me because he was absorbed in a book. Bedtime reading - reading in bed. Ex: Would you recommend horror stories for bedtime reading? Compulsive reading - so interesting that you can’t stop reading. Ex: More and more people are indulging … Continue reading Collocations about BOOKS

Order of Adverbs

An adverb is a word that gives more information about a verb, an adjective, another adverb, or even an entire sentence. It can be one word or an adverbial phrase: Emma loved her son deeply. Emma loved her son with all her heart. They describe: how an action is done (adverbs of manner): She pushed him gently. Where … Continue reading Order of Adverbs

Collocations with the Word "Hope"

Here are some collocations with the word "hope" to help you adopt natural English expressions as well as build up your vocabulary: Real / sincere hope It is my sincere hope their marriage will be a happy one. High hopes High hopes of his parents were not realized. False hope Don't give him false hope. … Continue reading Collocations with the Word "Hope"

GET vs TAKE

English learners sometimes get confused about the usage of these two verbs because it's not always easy to decide which one to use. Therefore, we need to be very careful when we use them. We can say that take means to hold or pick something, while get has meanings: obtain, reach, arrive. Besides, both verbs … Continue reading GET vs TAKE