Mistaken Words

 

ACCEPT or EXCEPT

ACCEPT – to take something willingly.

Ex: They accepted our offer.

EXCEPT: excluding, not including, other than.

Ex: Everyone was happy except Gilbert.

 

ADVICE or ADVISE

ADVICE (noun) is an opinion or suggestion given to someone.

Ex: Janine gave me a very good advice about cooking.

ADVISE  (verb) means to give advice to someone.

Ex: Alan did what we advised him to do.

 

ALL WAYS OR ALWAYS

ALL WAYS – by all means or methods.

Ex: We tried all ways to get a taxi.

ALWAYS – forever, at all times, usually.

Ex: Tom has always been a good friend of mine.

 

AT THE END or IN THE END

AT THE END is used for: end of physical location (at the end of the road), metaphorical end (at the end of the film), final point of a time period (she told us about that the end of the meeting).

IN THE END  – finally, after a long time (We worked hard, and in the end we were properly paid).

 

AFFECT or EFFECT

AFFECT – to influence and change.

Ex: The fact that she could cook affected their life a great deal.

EFFECT – to cause.

Ex: I hope that medicine will have good effect on him.

 

BECAUSE or BECAUSE OF

We use BECAUSE for clauses, and BECAUSE OF is for words or phrases.

I like him because he is kind  BUT  I like him because of his kindness.

Joanna wants a new phone because she lost her old one 

BUT  Joanna wants a new phone because of losing her old one.

 

BORROW or LEND

BORROW means that something is temporarily taken from another person.

Ex: Sally borrowed her dad’s car last night.

Simon borrowed 50$ from Sarah.

LEND means that something is temporarily given to another person.

Ex: Dad lent his car to Sally last night.

Sarah lent 50$ to Simon.        

 

BRING & TAKE

BRING describes the movement toward someone or something.

Pam brought a friend to the party.

We should bring a camera to the picnic with us.

TAKE describes the movement away from someone or something.

Take the rubbish to the bin. 

I’ll take the dog out for a walk.

 

EACH or EVERY

EACH is used for one or more things, taken one by one.

Ex: Each of the two boys was wrong.

EVERY is never used fot two, but always for more than two things, taken as a group.

Ex: She read every book in the library

Note: EACH and EVERY are always singular

Ex: Each (every) one of the twenty boys has a book.

 

FARTHER or FURTHER

Farther and Further are mostly interchangeable, but there is a major difference between them.

We use FARTHER when it is about physical distance.

Ex: He  climbed farther up the hill.

We use FURTHER when it is about symbolic distance.

Ex: They need to conduct further research.

 

FINISH or END

TO FINISH (v)–  refers to bringing any action into its completion.

Ex: We were hurrying to finish the job.

TO END (v)– refers to termination to any action.

Ex: The Second World War ended in 1945.                 

 

GOOD or WELL

GOOD (adj.) – use it to describe  a peron, place or thing.

Ex: He is a good painter.

WELL (adv.) – use it to describe an action.

Ex: She paints well.

 

MADE OF vs MADE FROM

MADE OF – we use it when we talk about the material something is made of.

Ex: This shirt is made of cotton.

This ring is made of gold.

MADE FROM – We use it when we talk about how something is produced.

Ex: The juice is made from oranges.

The cheese is made from milk.

 

MAY BE & MAYBE

MAY BE means ‘might be’, ‘could be’.

Ex: Your wallet may be on the table.

MAYBE means ‘perhaps’.

Ex: Maybe Sheila wants to be alone.

 

PEACE & PIECE

PEACE –state of tranquility, calmness, a time with no war.

Ex: I love to have my breakfast in peace.

PIECE –a separate part of something.

Ex: Julia gave a me a piece of chocolate.

 

RECENTLY or LATELY

RECENTLY – use it for non-repetive actions.

Ex: I have visited Rome recently.

LATELY: use it for repetitive actions.

Ex: I have been working out lately.

 

REFUSE or DENY

REFUSE – say that you do not accept something.

Ex: I refused to give him more money.

They invited me to the party but I had to refuse.

DENY – say that something is not true.

Ex: The prisoner denied robbing the bank.

He always denied accusations against him.

 

STAY or REMAIN

Verbs ‘stay’ and ‘remain’ are in most cases interchangeable but they developed unique idiomatic use.

I always stay with friends when in New York.

The audience remained silent after the performance ended.

 

IN TIME or ON TIME

In Time – early enough, with time to spare.

Ex: Peter got home just in time for dinner.

On time – at a certain planned time; neither early nor late.

Ex: The airplane arrives on time.

 

TASTE or FLAVOR

Words taste and flavor are not interchangeable, as many might think, and we use them differently.

The word TASTE refers to flavours we can feel with our senses: salty, sour, sweet or bitter.

The word FLAVOR refers to the quality of something which affects the sense of taste.

Taste and flavor are both verbs and nouns.

That soup tastes much better with garlic in it.

I like the taste of that chocolate cake.

The cooks flavored that dish with cardamom.

My favorite ice cream flavor is vanilla.

 

VICIOUS or VISCOUS

VICIOUS–refers to someone cruel and mean.

Ex: That vicious boy stole my purse.

VISCOUS-refers to something thick and sticky.

Ex: Honey is a viscous substance.

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