Word building: suffix -OUS

When we add the suffix -OUS to the nouns, they become adjectives.

The suffix -OUS means “full of” or “having the quality of”.

Let’s look at some commonly used adjectives with the suffix -OUS:

ENVIOUS – wanting something that another person has.
Ex: You shouldn’t be envious of people who have more than you do.

DANGEROUS – can cause harm.
Ex: Smoking is a dangerous habit.

FAMOUS – known by way many people.
Ex: Jennifer Lopez is very famous.

AMBITIOUS – having a strong desire for success.
Ex: John was ambitious when he was young.

MIRACULOUS – unusually surprising and unexpected.
Ex: Houdini made a miraculous escape from the ropes.

NERVOUS – worried.
Ex: I’m always nervous before an exam.

MYSTERIOUS – difficult to understand.
Ex: The woman disappeared under mysterious circumstances.

JEALOUS – unhappy because you wish you had something that is quality or belongs to another person.
Ex: Rhina is jealous of her ex-husband’s new wife.

POISONOUS – a substance able to cause illness or death.
Ex: We saw a poisonous snake this morning. We were really scared.

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Usage of the word FAR

FAR is usually used in questions and negative sentences:


London isn’t far from Coventry.


Is your job far from your house?


However, in affirmative sentences people usually say “a long way”:


Los Angeles is a long way from New York.


FAR is used in affirmative sentences only when it appears in phrases such as: too far, far away…

The house is too far from any settlements.

The Moon is far away from the Earth.

Adjectives with the suffix -ABLE

The suffix -able can be added to verbs to form adjectives that mean ‘capable of’ or ‘suitable for’.

Here are some examples of the adjectives with the suffix -able:

CAPABLE – having the ability to do something.
Ex: I am capable of typing very fast.

AFFORDABLE – cheap enough.
Ex: These holiday arrangements are affordable.

APPROACHABLE – friendly and easy to talk to.
Ex: Despite being famous, she is very approachable.

VALUABLE – worth and useful.
Ex: Sesame is a valuable source of vitamin C.

AVAILABLE – can be bought or used.
Ex: Tickets for the concert are available from the box office.

PREDICTABLE – can be predicted easily.
Ex: The ending of the book was totally predictable.

NOTICEABLE – can be seen or noticed easily.
Ex: There is a noticeable change in her behavior.

18 ways to say “thank you”

We need to say “thank you” so many times a day. Let’s learn how to say it in more than one or two ways.

Thank you/ Thanks/ Thank you very much/ Thanks a lot

Thanks a ton/a bunch/a million.

I am (really/very/so) grateful.

Thank you, I (really) appreciate it.

Cheers!

You shouldn’t have…

Many thanks.

Thank you from the bottom of my heart.

Please, accept my best thanks.

Accept my gratitude.

Thank you for not letting me down.

I thank you most warmly.

Words cannot describe how grateful I am.

What could/would I do without you?

I can’t thank you enough.

I owe you one.

I’ll never forget what you’ve done for me.

Ta!

Collocations with the word “room”

Bright / dark / comfortable / cosy / spacious / tiny / big / small room
I love my bright and spacious room.

Tidy / untidy / clean / stuffy / cold / warm room
It’s a cold / warm room.

A single / twin / double / triple room
When they got married, Brian and his wife spent their honeymoon in a double room in Hawaii.

Spare / guest room – a bedroom usually kept for visitors.
We rarely warm a spare / guest room in the winter months.

Share a room
David shares a room with his brother.

A waiting room – at the station or hospital

Tidy your room
You must tidy your room if you want to go out!

Book / hire / rent / let a room
We hired a lovely room with a sea view.

Let out rooms – rent rooms
We usually let out a spare room.

A room-mate – a person we share a room with
When I was a student I had a room-mate.

Causative verbs: let, make, have, get, help

The verbs let, make, have, get and help are called ‘causative’ verbs because they cause something to happen. As such, these verbs are used in a causative sentence structure.

Causative verb LET:

Meaning: allow someone to do something.

Structure: Let + person/thing + verb

Example sentences:

We couldn’t let our daughter adopt a kitten because she’s allergic to cats.

My brother let me use his computer when mine broke down.

Sarah never lets anyone tell her what to do.

Causative verb MAKE:

Meaning: force or require someone to do something.

Structure: Make + person + verb

Example sentences:

They make students exercise regularly.

John’s mum made him eat his dinner.

His parents tried to make him be a better person.

Causative verb HAVE:

Meaning: give someone the responsibility to do something.

Structure: Have + person + verb

Example sentences:

We had a painter paint our appartment.

Sheilla had a hairdresser do her hair.

Paul had a mechanic fix his car.

Causative verb GET:

Meaning: convince/persuade someone to do something.

Structure: Get + person + to + verb

Jane got her son to help her with the dishes.

She got her boyfriend to buy her an expensive ring.

I got my neighbor to help me carry my suitcase.

Causative verb HELP:

Meaning: give aid to someone in doing something.

Structure: Help + person + (to) verb

Note: (after “help” you can use the infinitive with to (to do) or bare infinitive (do).

Example sentences:

Helen helped me (to) do my homework.

A cup of coffee in the morning helps me (to) wake up.

My colleague helped me (to) write my CV.