18 ways to say “thank you”

We need to say “thank you” so many times a day. Let’s learn how to say it in more than one or two ways.

Thank you/ Thanks/ Thank you very much/ Thanks a lot

Thanks a ton/a bunch/a million.

I am (really/very/so) grateful.

Thank you, I (really) appreciate it.

Cheers!

You shouldn’t have…

Many thanks.

Thank you from the bottom of my heart.

Please, accept my best thanks.

Accept my gratitude.

Thank you for not letting me down.

I thank you most warmly.

Words cannot describe how grateful I am.

What could/would I do without you?

I can’t thank you enough.

I owe you one.

I’ll never forget what you’ve done for me.

Ta!

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Meanings of the verb ‘ask’

Ask is a very common verb in English and as such it has several meanings:

  • To request an answer from someone:

She asked him a question.

They asked them about the new product.

  • To make a request:

She asked the doctor to examine her.

They asked the bank for a loan.

  • To seek information:

We asked local people for directions.

Amanda asked me about the film I watched.

  • To invite:

The Johnsons have asked us to the party.

She asked them in for a coffee.

  • To demand something:

They ask $20.000 for the house.

This job asks for a lot of patience.

  • ASK + question word (what, who, where, when, how, why):

Jane asked me where I spent the weekend.

The guests asked who made the dinner.

Here are some phrasal verbs with the verb ‘ask’:

Phrasal verbs with ASK

Other ways to say “however”

Don’t you agree that “however” is a bit overused word? Well, here are some adequate alternatives:

After all

All the same

Albeit

Alternatively

Although

Anyhow

At any rate

Be that as it may

But

By way of contrast

Conversely

Despite that

Even so

For all that

In contrast

In whatever way

Having said that

In spite of

Meanwhile

Nonetheless

Notwithstanding

On the contrary

On the other hand

Otherwise

Per contra

Regardless

Still

Still and all

Then again

That being said

Though

Whatever

Whatsoever

Whereas

Without regard to

Yet

Expressions with “change”

Big / significant / considerable / revolutionary / drastic / important / major, radical change
Mobile phones have undergone a revolutionary change in the past decade.
Complete / systematic / minor / long-term / short-term / sudden / gradual / seasonal change
Gradual changes will bring more stability to the company.
Climate change
The effects of climate change include more frequent droughts and wildfires.
Bring about change
The only way to bring about changes in the company is to employ new people.
A change for the better / worse
I believe that this year will bring a change for the better.
A change of heart / mind
UK Brexit change of mind appeared first on Cyprus Mail.
Change clothes / shoes
I’m all wet. I’ll change my clothes.
Change trains / planes
We changed trains in Budapest.
Change the subject
I don’t want to talk about it any more. Can we change the subject?
Change jobs
I think you should change jobs.
Change one’s tune
He was against the project, but he changed his tune when he realized how much money it could bring.
Change your mind
At first, I didn’t want to go to the party, but then I changed my mind.
Change your ways
If he wants to stay and work in this company, he’ll have to change his ways.
Change of scene
You need a change of scene. Why don’t you go away for the weekend?

Latin Abbreviations in English

I’m sure most of you are familiar with Latin abbreviations use in English. There are many of them but I’ll try to explain most frequently used ones.

e.g. (exampli gratia)

We use “e.g.” for giving specific examples.

Ex:  I feel like eating something sweet, e.g. ice cream.

i.e. (id est)

This abbreviation is used to explain something clearer.

Ex:  Schools usually don’t work in the summertime, i.e. in July and August.

P.S. (post scriptum)

We add „P.S“. at the end of a letter when we want to write something more.

Ex: P.S. Best wishes to your family.

vs (versus)

This abbreviation basically means „against“. It is used to oppose two different things in competition.

Ex:  The New York’s Knicks vs Chicago Bulls.

cf. (confer)

You can normally see this in a book when the author wants to mention another source that tells about something. It means “refer to…“ or “compare“

Ex: Summer is a great time for outdoor activities (cf. John Smith for various types of summer pastimes).

etc. (et cetera)

This Latin abbreviation is used at the end of a list to show that there are more things included in the list but you don’t want to mention them.

Ex: We often see snails, bugs, birds, etc. in our garden.

et al (et alia)

“et al” usually comes right after a name and it means “and others.” It is used when there are too many names to list, but you still want to give credit to everybody.

Ex:   The method is explained in the work of Johnson et al.

 

Phrasal Verbs with ‘Go’

Here are several mostly used phrasal verbs starting with the verb ‘go’.

GO BY – pass.

She was sitting and watching the people go by.

GO BACK – return.

I’m going back in two weeks.

GO OFF – no longer fresh.

The strawberries have gone off.

GO DOWN – go to a lower position.

He went down on his knees and asked her to marry him.

GO THROUGH – accept officially.

We hope the new recycling law will go through.

GO OUT – go outdoors.

We’re going out for dinner.

GO ON – continue.

Show must go on.

GO FOR – choose.

I’ll go for the cheaper seat.

GO ALONG – support or agree.

Milly has accepted and Rob will probably go along with the idea.