GET vs TAKE

English learners sometimes get confused about the usage of these two verbs because it’s not always easy to decide which one to use. Therefore, we need to be very careful when we use them.

We can say that take means to hold or pick something, while get has meanings: obtain, reach, arrive.

Besides, both verbs form numerous collocations, idioms and phrases which we need to learn by heart just like any other vocabulary.

Here are some examples:

He took some cheese out of the fridge.

He always takes shower in the evening.

John took me to the cinema.

I got my salary on Friday.

I’m afraid I haven’t got your email.

I always get up at 7.

Do the quiz to perfect your knowledge:

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Usage of the word FAR

FAR is usually used in questions and negative sentences:


London isn’t far from Coventry.


Is your job far from your house?


However, in affirmative sentences people usually say “a long way”:


Los Angeles is a long way from New York.


FAR is used in affirmative sentences only when it appears in phrases such as: too far, far away…

The house is too far from any settlements.

The Moon is far away from the Earth.

Across vs Over vs Through

ACROSS  and OVER are both prepositions and adverbs. They are in most cases interchangeable.

Look at these sentences:

They had to go across the river to get to their house.

We walked over the bridge in the misty morning.

However, when the meaning is ‘from side to side’, ACROSS is preferred:

I ran across the street.

Juliana folded her arms across her chest.

When moving from one side to another in a surrounding environment, across is replaced by THROUGH:

I made my way through the bushes.

The Red Riding Hood went through the woods to get to her grandma’s house.

Don’t use THROUGH when talking about periods of time. In these cases, OVER is preferred.

I haven’t seen Tom much over the last three years.

Any Longer vs Any More vs No Longer

Any longer and any more (or anymore) are synonyms.

When we use any longer or any more, we need to use don’t/doesn’t because the adverbs express a negative relationship with time. It is also important that we put them at the end of the sentence.

However, when we use no longer, it comes between the subject and the verb. Unlike any longer and any more, it is used in positive sentences because it makes the sentence negative.

Examples:

I don’t drink coffee any longer.

I don’t drink coffee anymore.

I no longer drink coffee.

Especially and Specially

 Especially and specially are adverbs.

Especially means more than usual, most of all, in particular.

Judith likes chocolate, especially the dark one.

I like tea, especially the green tea.

He’s usually tired in the evening, but he was especially tired this evening.

Specially is used to talk about particular purpose or way of something.

This dress was specially tailored for Jane.

They ordered boots specially for her.

The pigs are specially trained to locate the truffles.

Mistaken Words Like and As

There is much confusion about these two words because they are similar in meaning. Here are some important differences between them:

LIKE is used:

  • to say what something or someone looks / is like.

Peter’s girl-friend looks like Annie Lennox.

Your doorbell sounds like a siren.

The soup smells like fish.

  • with noun / pronoun / gerund.

I look like my mum.

The balloon ride was like flying.

AS is used:

  • to describe someone’s job / role:

He had worked as a waiter before college.

As your teacher, I am proud of you.

  • in expressions: as…as, such as…, the same as…

Jane ran as fast as she could.

Brian visited many Mediterranean countries such as Italy, France, and Greece.