Idioms & Expressions

Idioms & Expressions

Expressions using ’clothes’


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Gloves are off
A situation which includes a serious dispute or even fight in order to achieve something.
Ex: I have been a friendly person so far, but now the gloves are off!
Below the belt
If something is below the belt, then we are talking about unacceptable behavior.
Ex: He told her that she was stupid which she felt as a hit below the belt.
Be tied to your mother’s/wife’s apron strings
Refers to people who are not capable of making decision independently or without their mother or wife.
Ex: He is 45 years old but he’s still tied to his mother’s apron strings.
Put a sock in it!
Impolite way of telling someone to be quiet.
Ex: Can’t you stop talking! Put a sock in it!
Big girl’s blouse
Used to insult a person who other people believe is behaving in a weak manner.
Ex: ‘I can’t help you carrying these books’ ‘Oh, please stop being such a big girl’s blouse.’
Keep it under your hat
To keep something a secret.

Ex: I’ve heard that Jane is having an affair but keep it under your hat.

 

Idioms & Expressions

‘Luck’ expressions


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Wish you good luck with these ‘luck’ expressions:

Twist of fate
A change in a sequence of events.
By a twist of fate, they met again in New York.
A stroke of good luck
Something good that happens when you least expect it.
I opened the book on exactly the same page by a stroke of good luck.
Golden opportunity
An excellent opportunity that is unlikely to be repeated.
This is a golden opportunity we must appreciate.
Jump at the chance
To quickly and unexpectedly get a lucky opportunity.
When the band singer became ill, Bob jumped at the chance and became famous.
Cross your fingers! (Keep your fingers crossed!)
Hoping the things will happen the way we want them to.
I’m having a driving test in the morning so cross your fingers.
Lucky guess
Happening by chance.
I didn’t know the answer. It was just a lucky guess.

Idioms & Expressions

Idioms using animals


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Bird’s eye view – a good view of something from a high position.

Ex: I live on the 17th floor, and I have a bird’s eye view of the city.

To have a bee in one’s bonnet –  to be obsessed about something.

Ex: John didn’t get the promotion he expected last year, and he has had a bee in his bonnet about it ever since.

To let the cat out of the bag – to reveal a secret.

Ex: It was supposed to be a surprise! Why did you let the cat out of the bag and told Mary about the party?

Donkey’s years – for a very long time.

Ex: It’s so nice to see you again! I haven’t seen you for donkey’s years!

To smell a rat – to be suspicious.

Ex: I don’t trust John when he says that he can’t help us paint the apartment because he’s working late. I smell a rat!

Like a fish out of water – to be in an unfamiliar situation.

Ex: I have started working for this company last week. I still feel like a fish out of water.

Straight from the horse’s mouth – to have an information from someone who’s directly involved.

Ex: “How did you know that Julia won’t come to the meeting?” “I heard it straight from the horse’s mouth.”

Wouldn’t say boo to a goose – used to describe someone who’s very quiet and shy.

Ex: Anna is so timid; she wouldn’t say boo to a goose.