Expressions with “change”

Big / significant / considerable / revolutionary / drastic / important / major, radical change
Mobile phones have undergone a revolutionary change in the past decade.
Complete / systematic / minor / long-term / short-term / sudden / gradual / seasonal change
Gradual changes will bring more stability to the company.
Climate change
The effects of climate change include more frequent droughts and wildfires.
Bring about change
The only way to bring about changes in the company is to employ new people.
A change for the better / worse
I believe that this year will bring a change for the better.
A change of heart / mind
UK Brexit change of mind appeared first on Cyprus Mail.
Change clothes / shoes
I’m all wet. I’ll change my clothes.
Change trains / planes
We changed trains in Budapest.
Change the subject
I don’t want to talk about it any more. Can we change the subject?
Change jobs
I think you should change jobs.
Change one’s tune
He was against the project, but he changed his tune when he realized how much money it could bring.
Change your mind
At first, I didn’t want to go to the party, but then I changed my mind.
Change your ways
If he wants to stay and work in this company, he’ll have to change his ways.
Change of scene
You need a change of scene. Why don’t you go away for the weekend?

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Expressions with “Keep”

’Keep’ is one of the most common verbs in English, and it forms lots of phrasal verbs, collocations and idioms. Here are some of them to help you express yourselves more naturally:

Keep up the good work!

Our dog buried my wallet somewhere around here. Keep on digging!

If you want to sell more, you have to keep the prices low.

They usually keep things formal in that company.

We like to keep our home clean and tidy.

Could you keep the volume down? The baby is sleeping.

Coffee keeps me awake.

The only way for Tim to get a job is to keep trying.

Keep on driving! We’ll find our way.

Keep quiet! We’re in hospital.

You have to keep him from drinking alcohol.

We work hard to keep our home safe.

Keep off the grass!

We’re not sure what time we’re leaving but we’ll keep you informed.

Keep me updated about the changes in your schedule.

If we keep to the agenda, the meeting will be over in no time.

Everyone should try and keep up with the news in the world.

Peter is not very sociable. He prefers to keep himself for himself.

Sam’s parents keep him from enrolling a master degree because they think he should get a job.

It wasn’t easy to learn to ski but I kept at it and now I can ski.

Expressions with ‘Live’

Here are five expressive idioms with the verb ‘live’:

Live and breathe something – be devoted to a particular activity.

I lived and breathed sport while I was a child.

Live to tell the tale – survive something dangerous and be able to tell the others about it.

Some people survive cancer and live to tell the tale.

Live one’s own life – live your life the way you want it , follow your own principles, be independent.

I don’t want to follow my father’s footsteps. I want to live my own life.

Live and learn! – used to acknowledge a new experience.

I’ll never try to ride my bike in the storm again. Live and learn!

Live in hope – remain optimistic.

We live in hope that our daughter will find a good job.

Expressions with ‘SAVE’

Here are some common English expressions which could be useful in many different situations:

Save a bundle – save a lot of money.
Ex: I saved a bundle by buying things on sales.
Save one’s breath – it’s no use talking to someone as they’re not listening.
Ex: Save your breath! They can’t hear you because of the noise.
A penny saved is a penny earned – it is wise to save money.
Ex: The manager advised everyone to save and said that ‘a penny saved is a penny earned’.
Save for a rainy day – to put some money aside for unexpected difficulties.
Ex: Fortunately, Sue had some money saved for a rainy day.
A stitch in time saves nine – it is better to deal with problems immediately before they deteriorate.
Ex: You should deal with that problem now. You know what they say – a stich in time saves nine.
Saved by the bell – when something happens and interrupts difficult situation.
Ex: Luckily someone opened the door so I didn’t have to answer the unpleasant question.
To save the day – to do something that solves a serious problem.
Ex: Helen’s mother saved the day when she gave us some money for the taxi.

“Cat” Idioms

If you fancy cats then you might be interested in learning these ‘CAT’ idioms:
When the cat’s away, the mice will play – to describe what happens when the teacher leaves the classroom.
Ex: They shouldn’t be so loud, but the teacher left the classroom, and when the cat’s away, the mice will play.
Put the cat among pigeons – there’s going to be a trouble because of something someone had said or done.
Ex: Don’t tell them about our competitors’ success, it’ll put cats among pigeons.
There isn’t enough room to swing a cat – describe a room as too small.
Ex: My office is so small; there isn’t enough room to swing a cat.
Let the cat out of the bag – tell a secret, usually unintentionally.
Ex: We’ve been preparing a surprise party for Fiona’s birthday, but Len let the cat out of the bag and told her.
Curiosity killed the cat – warn someone not to try to find out someone’s private matters.
Ex: You shouldn’t ask Jill so many personal questions; you may insult her. Curiosity killed the cat.
Like a cat on hot bricks – tell someone that they’re being nervous.
Ex: He’s been walking around all morning like a cat on hot bricks.
There’s more than one way to skin a cat – there are different ways of doing something.
Ex: Our negotiations may have failed this time but there’s more than one way to skin a cat.
Not have a cat in hell’s chance – not have a chance at all.
Ex: They don’t have a cat in hell’s chance of buying a decent house for that amount of money.

Binomials

There are many phrases in English that use two words connected with ‘and’. For example wine and dine, home and hosed. These expressions are known as binomials. In these phrases the word order is usually fixed; we always say ‘wine and dine’, we never say ‘dine and wine’.

Home and hosed – safe and successful.
Ex: I’ve passed the test so I’m home and hosed for the time being.
Time and again – repeatedly
Ex: He was asking himself the same question time and again.
Wine and dine – eat and drink well.
Ex: We used to wine and dine in expensive restaurants every night during our holiday in Greece.
Alive and well – healthy and active
Ex: I came down with flu last week but I’m alive and well now.
Divide and rule – the policy intended to keep someone in the position of disagreement for easier manipulation.
Ex: The government’s policy of divide and rule caused great disorder in the country.
Up and down – move repeatedly forwards and backwards along the given path.
Ex: We were walking up and down the beach every evening.
There and then – happens immediately
Ex: Ashley felt that she should tell him the truth there and then.
More and more – increasingly
Ex: Stephen became more and more calm and stable.
Give and take – people should cooperate and compromise in order to be successful.
Ex: Every relationship requires lots of give and take.
Home and dry – to have finished something successfully.
Ex: Bob and Lucy have signed the contract so they’re home and dry now.
Dribs and drabs – small, negligible amounts
Ex: I haven’t eaten anything properly today. Just dribs and drabs here and there.