Prepositions of TIME – IN, ON, AT

With IN, we use the following time expressions: parts of the day – in the morning, in the afternoon, in the eveningseasons – in spring, in summer, in autumn, in winteryears – in 2017, in the 1990s With ON, we use the following time expressions: days of the week – on Monday / on Sundays, … Continue reading Prepositions of TIME – IN, ON, AT

Indefinite Pronouns

Indefinite pronouns are: anyone, anything, anybody, anywhere, someone, something, somebody, somewhere, no one, nothing, nobody, nowhere. Indefinite pronouns do not refer to any specific person, thing, place or amount.  We normally use –one, -body, -thing, -where to refer to people, things or places in a general way: Anyone could steal your purse. Someone is knocking … Continue reading Indefinite Pronouns

Comparison of Adjectives with as … as, not as … as, etc.

As…as We use as + adjective + as to make comparisons between the things which are equal: Sarah is as pretty as her sister. You have to pack it as carefully as you can. It’s fragile. We worked as hard as we could. Not as … as We use not as … as to make … Continue reading Comparison of Adjectives with as … as, not as … as, etc.

Zero Conditional

Conditional sentences consist of two or more clauses. One of the clauses is the "if clause" and the other is the "main clause". Both if clause and main clause are usually in Present Simple Tense. If I can't sleep -------------- I listen to the radio. -------if clause --------------------- main clause------ The zero conditional is used … Continue reading Zero Conditional

Relative Pronouns

Most commonly used relative pronouns are who, which, that, whose, when and where. We normally use who for people and some pet animals and which for things. We can use that instead of who or which. The woman who (that) gave me the letter. She gave me the letter which (that) was red. This is the computer which (that) costs a lot of money. Is this the person … Continue reading Relative Pronouns

How to Use “So” and “Such” Correctly

So and such are used to strengthen the meaning of adjectives. So is used before an adjective without a noun. For example: The film was so boring. My neighbors are so loud. Such is used before an adjective that comes with a noun. For example: It is such a lovely day today. This water pipe … Continue reading How to Use “So” and “Such” Correctly

Order of Adverbs

An adverb is a word that gives more information about a verb, an adjective, another adverb, or even an entire sentence. It can be one word or an adverbial phrase: Emma loved her son deeply. Emma loved her son with all her heart. They describe: how an action is done (adverbs of manner): She pushed him gently. Where … Continue reading Order of Adverbs

GET vs TAKE

English learners sometimes get confused about the usage of these two verbs because it's not always easy to decide which one to use. Therefore, we need to be very careful when we use them. We can say that take means to hold or pick something, while get has meanings: obtain, reach, arrive. Besides, both verbs … Continue reading GET vs TAKE

Prepositions of Place – AT, IN, ON

There is a lot of confusion about the prepositions AT, IN, ON related to place. The prepositions IN, ON, AT can be used to locate something. Here are some explanations altogether with example sentences. AT AT is used to describe the position of something at a particular place. Examples: at the bus (railway) station, airport … Continue reading Prepositions of Place – AT, IN, ON

Usage of the word FAR

FAR is usually used in questions and negative sentences: London isn’t far from Coventry. Is your job far from your house? However, in affirmative sentences people usually say “a long way”: Los Angeles is a long way from New York. FAR is used in affirmative sentences only when it appears in phrases such as: too … Continue reading Usage of the word FAR