Order of Adverbs

An adverb is a word that gives more information about a verb, an adjective, another adverb, or even an entire sentence. It can be one word or an adverbial phrase:

Emma loved her son deeply.

Emma loved her son with all her heart.

They describe:

  • how an action is done (adverbs of manner):

She pushed him gently.

  • Where (adverbs of place):

We saw him at the cinema.

  • and when (adverbs of time):

She met him at 7 o’clock.

If there is more than one adverb, they usually go like this:

MANNER – PLACE – TIME

The New York Knicks played marvellously in Boston last night.

We were walking in the park in the afternoon.

Sometimes we place the adverb at the beginning of the sentence before the subject:

Yesterday, it was raining all day.

Sometimes, I like to have my tea in the evening.

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GET vs TAKE

English learners sometimes get confused about the usage of these two verbs because it’s not always easy to decide which one to use. Therefore, we need to be very careful when we use them.

We can say that take means to hold or pick something, while get has meanings: obtain, reach, arrive.

Besides, both verbs form numerous collocations, idioms and phrases which we need to learn by heart just like any other vocabulary.

Here are some examples:

He took some cheese out of the fridge.

He always takes shower in the evening.

John took me to the cinema.

I got my salary on Friday.

I’m afraid I haven’t got your email.

I always get up at 7.

Do the quiz to perfect your knowledge:

Prepositions of Place – AT, IN, ON

There is a lot of confusion about the prepositions AT, IN, ON related to place.

The prepositions IN, ON, AT can be used to locate something.

Here are some explanations altogether with example sentences.

AT


AT is used to describe the position of something at a particular place.

Examples:

at the bus (railway) station, airport


at the entrance /door /gate


at the crossroads /junction


at the top of the mountain/hill/ building


at Clare’s house / at home

Example sentences:


They were very proud when they arrived at the top of the mountain.


You can call me on my stable phone. I’ll be at home all day.


Jane was standing at the door when she saw them coming.

IN

IN is used to describe the position of something within a closed space.

Examples:

In a bus / car / taxi


In a building / restaurant/ cafe / school / hospital


In a bag / suitcase / wallet


In London / New York


In Mexico / the UK


in the news / magazine / newspaper

Example sentences:


She found some clothes in her wardrobe.


She was watching around while driving in a taxi.


I’ve never lived in Mexico.

ON

ON is used to describe a position on top of a surface of something.

Examples:

On the wall/ celling/


On the table / desk / shelf


On the floor / carpet / rug


On a street / road


On a river / beach / coast / island


On the website / page / screen

Example sentences:

They hang a picture on the wall.


Your keys are on the table.


You can find more information about ticket reservations on this website.

To check your knowledge, do the quiz bellow:

Usage of the word FAR

FAR is usually used in questions and negative sentences:


London isn’t far from Coventry.


Is your job far from your house?


However, in affirmative sentences people usually say “a long way”:


Los Angeles is a long way from New York.


FAR is used in affirmative sentences only when it appears in phrases such as: too far, far away…

The house is too far from any settlements.

The Moon is far away from the Earth.

Adjectives with the suffix -ABLE

The suffix -able can be added to verbs to form adjectives that mean ‘capable of’ or ‘suitable for’.

Here are some examples of the adjectives with the suffix -able:

CAPABLE – having the ability to do something.
Ex: I am capable of typing very fast.

AFFORDABLE – cheap enough.
Ex: These holiday arrangements are affordable.

APPROACHABLE – friendly and easy to talk to.
Ex: Despite being famous, she is very approachable.

VALUABLE – worth and useful.
Ex: Sesame is a valuable source of vitamin C.

AVAILABLE – can be bought or used.
Ex: Tickets for the concert are available from the box office.

PREDICTABLE – can be predicted easily.
Ex: The ending of the book was totally predictable.

NOTICEABLE – can be seen or noticed easily.
Ex: There is a noticeable change in her behavior.

Causative verbs: let, make, have, get, help

The verbs let, make, have, get and help are called ‘causative’ verbs because they cause something to happen. As such, these verbs are used in a causative sentence structure.

Causative verb LET:

Meaning: allow someone to do something.

Structure: Let + person/thing + verb

Example sentences:

We couldn’t let our daughter adopt a kitten because she’s allergic to cats.

My brother let me use his computer when mine broke down.

Sarah never lets anyone tell her what to do.

Causative verb MAKE:

Meaning: force or require someone to do something.

Structure: Make + person + verb

Example sentences:

They make students exercise regularly.

John’s mum made him eat his dinner.

His parents tried to make him be a better person.

Causative verb HAVE:

Meaning: give someone the responsibility to do something.

Structure: Have + person + verb

Example sentences:

We had a painter paint our appartment.

Sheilla had a hairdresser do her hair.

Paul had a mechanic fix his car.

Causative verb GET:

Meaning: convince/persuade someone to do something.

Structure: Get + person + to + verb

Jane got her son to help her with the dishes.

She got her boyfriend to buy her an expensive ring.

I got my neighbor to help me carry my suitcase.

Causative verb HELP:

Meaning: give aid to someone in doing something.

Structure: Help + person + (to) verb

Note: (after “help” you can use the infinitive with to (to do) or bare infinitive (do).

Example sentences:

Helen helped me (to) do my homework.

A cup of coffee in the morning helps me (to) wake up.

My colleague helped me (to) write my CV.