Travel Phrasal Verbs

It’s summer time and few of us aren’t going to hit the road in search for the best tourist destination where we could have proper rest and lots of fun. I hope this post will come handy as it looks at the phrasal verbs used to talk about things when travelling.
Go away – go on a trip
I’m going away next week. I’ve been working hard lately and I need some rest.
Set off – leave, start travelling.
We are setting off early in order to avoid heavy traffic.
Look forward to – to be excited and impatient about something that is going to happen.
I’m looking forward to my holiday next week! I’m dead tired.
Get in – arrive
What time do we get in Paris?
See off – to go to a place that someone is leaving from to tell them goodbye.
We saw the children off yesterday. They’ve gone camping.
Go back – return to the place you were before.
We are going back home in two days, but I wish we could stay longer.
Check in – to arrive at a hotel and get the key for your room.

We checked in at two in the morning because the plane was late.

Check out – to leave a hotel after paying for your room and returning the key.
We must check out before 11.
Look around – to visit a place and look at things there.
They spent all day looking around the town.
Drop someone off – to drive someone somewhere and leave them there, especially if it’s on your way.
Can you drop me off at the station on your way to work?
Pick up – collect
Can you pick me up from the airport tomorrow afternoon, please?
Take off – when a plane leaves the ground.
Would you please fasten your seatbelts, the plane is taking off.
Stop over – to stay somewhere for some time on the way to somewhere else.
On our way to Spain, we’ll stop over in Rome to see the sights.

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Nouns which are only singular

Most nouns in English have both singular and plural forms. However, there are some nouns that are only used in the singular form. These are:

  • Names of particular people, places, events, etc.

Peter, Johnson, Trafalgar Square, Easter, Saturday…

Although, you can use them in the plural if you think of them in a ‘countable’ way:

We never work on Saturdays.

The Johnsons are coming for lunch this evening.

  • Most uncountable nouns: water, furniture, advice, hair…

Water is cold today.

Good advice is better than rubies.

  • Some nouns ending in ‘S’: politics, Emirates, crossroads, measles, physics, maths,…

Emirates is charging for seat selection.

Politics is not my cup of tea.

How common is measles in your country?

WHO or WHOM?

Who and whom are interrogative pronouns. Many people live their lives without using WHOM at all, thinking that whom should be used in formal situations only. If you want to speak English properly, then you need to know about usage of both WHO and WHOM.

The rule is:

WHO is used in the subject position in a sentence:

Who bought you that ring?

WHOM is used in the object position:

The man whom you invited to dinner.

We also use WHOM after prepositions:

For whom the bell tolls.

To whom you want to talk?

How can you tell whether to use WHO or WHOM? It’s simple! If your pronoun can be replaced with ’he’ or ’she’, then use WHO. If it can be replaced with ’him’ or ’her’ or any other object pronoun, then use WHOM.

Who took my pen? (He/she took my pen – subject)

Whom is the book about? (About him – object)

In order to perfect your knowledge, try and do the quiz below:

WHO and WHOM QUIZ

Reciprocal Pronouns: Each Other & One Another

We use reciprocal pronouns each other and one another when two or more people are acting on each other.

Rhina and Sam saw each other yesterday.

The boys helped one another do their homework.

They talk to each other in French.

Both each other and one another refer to either persons or things.

They connected the two computers to each other.

High mountains were facing one another.

Each other used to refer to two people and one another to more than two people. However, since this distinction is disappearing in modern English and the two phrases are becoming interchangeable, we may feel a bit insecure when deciding which one to use.

Romeo and Juliet loved each other/one another.

People communicate to each other/one another over the Internet a lot today.

We can also use the possessive form of each other and one another:

Tom and Sally helped look after each other’s/one another’s children.

Prepositions of Place

Prepositions of place refer to a location of something. They answer the question ‘where’. Take a look at these prepositions of place:

Above — over or higher than

There was a mirror above his head.

Below — in a lower level

The temperature dropped to 10 degrees below zero last night.

Beside — near, at the side of

Our house was built right beside the park.

Next to — right beside, close to

The building next to ours was painted green.

(In) between — in the space that separates two places, people, or objects

The child was sitting between his parents.

In front of –– before of someone or something

Susan was waiting in front of the restaurant.

Behind — at the back of

Paul sat behind Alice.

At – next to

The students were sitting at their desks.

On – in a position above and touching it

There are some books on the shelf.

In — inside

There were two apples in a bowl.

Inside — within a space

They put a kitten inside the basket.

Outside — not inside

It is raining outside.

On top of — over, upon

There was a vase on top of the fridge.

Over – directly above

 He put his hands over his head.

Under — below

A dog hid under the bed.

Underneath — directly below

She put her bag underneath the chair.

Reflexive Pronouns

The reflexive pronouns are:
Singularmyself, yourself, himself, herself, itself

Pluralourselves, yourselves, themselves

Reflexive pronouns are used after certain verbs such as: cut, burn, enjoy, hurt, look at, amuse, dry, kill, satisfy, teach, etc. We use them when the subject and the object of the verb are the same person.

I made myself a salad.

He cut himself while shaving.

Enjoy yourselves!

We are looking at ourselves in the mirror.

Notice the difference between yourself and yourselves:

Milly, you can hurt yourself with this sharp knife.

Rebecca and Alex, you can hurt yourselves.

We do not use reflexive pronouns after the verbs relax, feel, concentrate, meet.

I feel nervous. I can’t concentrate. (not I can’t concentrate myself).

Shall we meet at 5 o’clock? (not shall we meet ourselves)

Reflexive prepositions cannot be used after a preposition of place. We normally use object pronouns after them.

I don’t have my telephone with me.

He saw a man standing next to him.

We can use BY to emphasize that the subject of the verb did something alone.

I cleaned the house by myself.

Mary travelled to Turkey all by herself.

Take a look at these expressions with reflexive pronouns:

Enjoy yourselves at the party!

Start behaving yourselves, children!

Make yourself at home!

Help yourself to a drink!

 

Exercise:

Fill in the gaps with the appropriate pronoun:

  1. Norman is looking at _________ in the mirror.
  2. I can’t pay for_______. Would you lend me some money?
  3. Oliver and Terry had to amuse _______ while their mother was in the kitchen.
  4. I’m so sorry I didn’t bring my camera with ______.
  5. If you want to succeed, you must believe in _______.
  6. We enjoyed _______ at the party last night.
  7. Laura is drying ______ with a towel.
  8. The cat is licking ________.
  9. Our children prepared lunch __________.
  10. I could never do it ________!

 

Key: 1.himself, 2. myself, 3. themselves, 4. me, 5. yourself, 6. ourselves, 7. herself, 8. itself, 9. by themselves, 10. by myself