18 ways to say “thank you”

We need to say “thank you” so many times a day. Let’s learn how to say it in more than one or two ways.

Thank you/ Thanks/ Thank you very much/ Thanks a lot

Thanks a ton/a bunch/a million.

I am (really/very/so) grateful.

Thank you, I (really) appreciate it.

Cheers!

You shouldn’t have…

Many thanks.

Thank you from the bottom of my heart.

Please, accept my best thanks.

Accept my gratitude.

Thank you for not letting me down.

I thank you most warmly.

Words cannot describe how grateful I am.

What could/would I do without you?

I can’t thank you enough.

I owe you one.

I’ll never forget what you’ve done for me.

Ta!

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Collocations with the word “room”

Bright / dark / comfortable / cosy / spacious / tiny / big / small room
I love my bright and spacious room.

Tidy / untidy / clean / stuffy / cold / warm room
It’s a cold / warm room.

A single / twin / double / triple room
When they got married, Brian and his wife spent their honeymoon in a double room in Hawaii.

Spare / guest room – a bedroom usually kept for visitors.
We rarely warm a spare / guest room in the winter months.

Share a room
David shares a room with his brother.

A waiting room – at the station or hospital

Tidy your room
You must tidy your room if you want to go out!

Book / hire / rent / let a room
We hired a lovely room with a sea view.

Let out rooms – rent rooms
We usually let out a spare room.

A room-mate – a person we share a room with
When I was a student I had a room-mate.

Causative verbs: let, make, have, get, help

The verbs let, make, have, get and help are called ‘causative’ verbs because they cause something to happen. As such, these verbs are used in a causative sentence structure.

Causative verb LET:

Meaning: allow someone to do something.

Structure: Let + person/thing + verb

Example sentences:

We couldn’t let our daughter adopt a kitten because she’s allergic to cats.

My brother let me use his computer when mine broke down.

Sarah never lets anyone tell her what to do.

Causative verb MAKE:

Meaning: force or require someone to do something.

Structure: Make + person + verb

Example sentences:

They make students exercise regularly.

John’s mum made him eat his dinner.

His parents tried to make him be a better person.

Causative verb HAVE:

Meaning: give someone the responsibility to do something.

Structure: Have + person + verb

Example sentences:

We had a painter paint our appartment.

Sheilla had a hairdresser do her hair.

Paul had a mechanic fix his car.

Causative verb GET:

Meaning: convince/persuade someone to do something.

Structure: Get + person + to + verb

Jane got her son to help her with the dishes.

She got her boyfriend to buy her an expensive ring.

I got my neighbor to help me carry my suitcase.

Causative verb HELP:

Meaning: give aid to someone in doing something.

Structure: Help + person + (to) verb

Note: (after “help” you can use the infinitive with to (to do) or bare infinitive (do).

Example sentences:

Helen helped me (to) do my homework.

A cup of coffee in the morning helps me (to) wake up.

My colleague helped me (to) write my CV.

When and how to use “used to”

The structure used to + infinitive is used to talk about past habits, jobs, or hobbies we no longer practice or which we replaced with the new ones


I used to play a lot of football when I was younger; now I go to the gym.
They used to be good friends, but now they hardly ever meet.
My grandpa used to be a mayor before he retired.


The negative form of used to is didn’t use to.


I didn’t use to drink coffee, but now I do.
My hometown didn’t use to be so polluted, but it is now.


The interrogative form is: Did you use to…?


Did you use to collect stamps when you were younger?
Did they use to walk every evening while on holiday?
Did you use to get up early when you were younger?

Note:

The structure used to + infinitive cannot be used to say frequency or duration.

I used to visit Rome many times.

I used to live in this neighbourhood for 10 years.

Meanings of the verb ‘ask’

Ask is a very common verb in English and as such it has several meanings:

  • To request an answer from someone:

She asked him a question.

They asked them about the new product.

  • To make a request:

She asked the doctor to examine her.

They asked the bank for a loan.

  • To seek information:

We asked local people for directions.

Amanda asked me about the film I watched.

  • To invite:

The Johnsons have asked us to the party.

She asked them in for a coffee.

  • To demand something:

They ask $20.000 for the house.

This job asks for a lot of patience.

  • ASK + question word (what, who, where, when, how, why):

Jane asked me where I spent the weekend.

The guests asked who made the dinner.

Here are some phrasal verbs with the verb ‘ask’:

Phrasal verbs with ASK

Nouns which are only plural

There are three groups of nouns that we use only in the plural. We use them with plural verbs and plural pronouns:

Your glasses are dirty. Take a tissue to wipe them.

These groups of nouns are:

1) Nouns related to items consisting of two parts (glasses, scissors, jeans, trousers…)

My new trousers are so cosy.

You can talk about them in singular if you use ‘a pair of’:

This pair of scissors is very sharp.

2) Nouns ending in –S (clothes, stairs, belongings, thanks, congratulations…)

These clothes are dirty.

The stairs in their house were too narrow.

Remember that these nouns are countable as they answer the question how many, not how much.

How many belongings have you got?

3) Nouns which express groups of people or animals (police, cattle, folk, people, poultry…)

The police are in front of the building.

They use growth hormones to make cattle grow faster.